Member Research Projects

The Fellowship invites its members to share with visitors to this site their intellectual interests and work. Below you will find some of the work of our members listed in alphabetical order by author's last name. Those projects are also randomly displayed on our home page. To add your project, access the Research tab in your Member's profile page.

Title Author Brief Description

Shawnee, Kansas, Smart Policing Initiative: Reducing Crime and Automobile Collisions through Data-Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety (DDACTS)

Dr. Kevin Michael Bryant

From 2008 to 2010, the city of Shawnee, Kansas, experienced a 22 percent increase in violent crime. At the same time, the Shawnee Police Department (SPD) was acutely aware of persistent traffic accident hot spots. Moreover, budgetary constraints resulted in nearly a 5-percent decrease in the department’s sworn staff in one year (2009). The SPD leadership became increasingly concerned about their ability to maintain a sufficient level of service, and to effectively respond to changing crime trends in the city. In response to these emerging concerns, the SPD implemented the Data-Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety (DDACTS) model beginning in July 2010. DDACTS identifies locations where crime and traffic problems disproportionately co-occur, and then deploys increased police presence and high-visibility traffic enforcement (HVTE) in those areas. The DDACTS model is grounded in seven guiding principles that highlight collaboration, data-driven decision-making, hot spots policing, and ongoing program assessment and dissemination of findings. In 2011, the Department received funding from the Bureau of Justice Assistance’s Smart Policing Initiative (SPI) to support the implementation of DDACTS and conduct a rigorous evaluation of the impact of the DDACTS model on crime and automobile crashes in the city of Shawnee.
The Shawnee SPI team employed a three-pronged evaluation to examine the implementation and impact of the DDACTS model. First, the SPI team conducted two waves of focus groups with officers from units throughout the department. Results from the focus groups showed evidence of a shift in culture and officer “buy-in,” especially with the divisions of the department most closely associated with the model. Participants agreed that DDACTS is an effective and sustainable initiative. The first wave of focus groups identified several areas in need of improvement, most notably with providing training, addressing concerns over resource depletion, and delivery of a clear message about the foundations and goals of the program.
Second, the Shawnee SPI team administered surveys to businesses and residents in the DDACTS target area, well after program implementation. Results indicated that a majority of respondents perceived a greater police presence and more traffic stops in the area, and they expressed support for high-visibility, targeted traffic enforcement. Moreover, most respondents stated that DDACTS has improved the quality of life in Shawnee, and the majority rated the relationship between SPD and residents and businesses as very good to excellent.
Third, the Shawnee SPI team employed a quantitative impact evaluation of DDACTS by comparing trends in crime over a six-year period (three years pre-implementation and three years post) in the target area and a comparison area. Using both bivariate and interrupted time series analysis, the SPI team demonstrated that the DDACTS model produced statistically significant decreases in robberies (88 percent), commercial burglaries (84 percent), and vehicle crashes (24 percent). The Shawnee SPI experience highlighted several important lessons for police managers and line officers, including recognition of the fundamental connection between crime and traffic problems, the importance of program fidelity through careful implementation, and the need to overcome the tendency to view DDACTS through a “zero tolerance” lens that minimizes the collaborative, data-driven, and problem-solving aspects of the model.

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An external perspective on institutional Catholicity in higher education: A case study

Dr. Timothy J Collins

Ed.D. Dissertation...this research identifies a set of 15 signal features for identification of a distinctively Roman Catholic institution of higher education.

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A Catholic Philosophy of Education: The Church and Two Philosophers

Rev. Dr. Mario O. D'Souza, CSB

Mario O. D'Souza

A Catholic Philsoophy of Education: The Church and Two Philosophers

Monteral & Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2016

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With God in America: The Spiritual Legacy of An Unlikely Jesuit

John M. DeJak

In 1963, following twenty-three years of hard labor and abuse in Russian prison camps, Walter J. Ciszek, S.J., finally returned to America. Had he come back a bitter man, or a man of diminished faith, it would have been hard to fault him. But he didn’t. For the remainder of his years, until his death in 1984, Fr. Ciszek’s grace, faith, and wisdom touched—often in profound and lasting ways—everyone who came into contact with him.

With God in America is a collection of previously unpublished writings on Ciszek’s post-imprisonment life and thoughts. The contents—which include articles he wrote, speeches he delivered at retreats, letters he sent to people he was counseling, and interviews with individuals who knew him personally—present a man unbroken by all that he had endured and eager to share God’s love with others.

From Ciszek’s first days back home in the States to his final words before his death, With God in America demonstrates that saintliness isn’t primarily about acting heroically in dramatic or devastating circumstances, but about honoring the ordinary, everyday aspects of life as treasured gifts from God.

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The Gospels: Rescued from Historical-Critical Speculation

Mr. Jerome Daniel Gilmartin

The Dead Sea Scrolls have enabled a sea-change advance in the understanding of 1st century Hebrew and Aramaic. That philological exegesis, encouraged by Pope Pius XII in Divino Afflante Spiritu and by the Pontifical Biblical Commission, points to early Gospel origin – well within the probable lifetimes of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. The full article can also be viewed / downloaded as a PDF at: http://7stepcatholic.org > The Gospels: Rescued from Historical-Critical Speculation. View

Technological Aspects of a Pro-Life Bibliography

Dr. Jeff James Koloze

This paper will summarize not only the research, but also technical aspects in constructing an Internet pro-life bibliography.  The paper implements research presented at the University Faculty for Life conference at the University of San Francisco in 2013.

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Faithful Citizenship, Voting, and the Life Issues

Joe Kral

Do issues exist that are more important than others when looking at a candidate? This brief article explores what the preemininent issues are for the Catholic voter and why the US Bishops see them as preeminent. You may view the document here: http://www.truthandcharityforum.org/faithful-citizenship-voting-and-the-life-issues/

 

 

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The Modern American Christian Martyr

Joe Kral

American secularism has begun a new way in which to persecute Christians for practicing their faith. This persecuation differs in its approach than that of the ancient Romans or Modern day ISIS. Rather it seeks to destroy Christianity by targeting other central tenets of the faith. You may read the full article here:

http://www.truthandcharityforum.org/the-modern-american-christian-martyr/

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A Day Without Death--A Pro-Life Review of the Movie "Risen"

Joe Kral

This article, originally published in Truth and Charity Forum, review the movie "Risen" from a pro-life point of view. It ponders the question "What were the ramifications of Clavius' conversion, especially when it comes to the life issues?" This is particularly important for the viewer since Clavius was Roman and embraced all things Roman, including infanticide and abortion. You may read the article here:

http://www.truthandcharityforum.org/a-day-without-death-a-pro-life-review-of-the-movie-risen/

http://www.truthandcharityforum.org/a-day-without-death-a-pro-life-review-of-the-movie-risen/

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Stepping Toward a Culture of Life: Indiana Bill HB 1337

Joe Kral

Recently, Indiana Governor, Mike Pence, just signed a pro-life omnibus bill. This brief article looks at the pros and cons of this legislation and offers suggestions at how it can improve and how it is a proper step in the direction of the Culture of Life. You may view the article here:

http://www.truthandcharityforum.org/stepping-toward-a-culture-of-life-indiana-hb-1337/

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Relativism, Authority, Scripture, and the Culture of Death

Joe Kral

Does the Bible address the idea of relativism? Can relativism lead to a Culture of Death? How does Scripture address these issues? This brief article explores how Scripture addresses when figures such as Adam, Eve, and Pontius Pilate adhere to a philosophy of relativism. Their actions, as we know, have drastic consequences, that show just how this philosophy leads to a Culture of Death. You may view the article here: http://www.truthandcharityforum.org/relativism-authority-scripture-and-the-culture-of-death/

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St. Maximilian Kolbe: Patron for Pro-Life Journalists, Editors, and Essayists!

Joe Kral

No doubt, St. Maximilian Kolbe is best known for his selfless act that saved a life in the death camp known as Auschwitz. His courageous sacrifice helped propel him to be the Patron for the Pro-Life movement. But what else within the movement can he be a patron for? This brief article discusses how pro-life journalists, essayists, and editors can model themselves after St. Maximilian Kolbe as well. You may find the article here:

http://www.truthandcharityforum.org/st-maximilian-kolbe-patron-for-pro-life-journalists-editors-and-essayists/

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Servant of God Dorothy Day: Patron for Post-Abortive Women

Joe Kral

Interestingly, there has been a little contention in naming Dorothy Day as a Patron within the pro-life movement. This brief article explains just how Servant of God Dorothy Day serves as a holy model for women who have experienced an abortion.http://www.truthandcharityforum.org/servant-of-god-dorothy-day-patron-for-post-abortive-mothers/

 

 

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Time to Amend Unborn Victims of Violence Laws

Joe Kral

The recent case in Houston, Texas where a 24 year old middle school teacher who had an abortion to hid her crime of sexual abuse with her 13 year old student highlights some problems within current Unborn Victims of Violence laws that need to be addressed. This brief article explores a way in which this problem may be addressed legislatively. You may find the article here:

http://www.truthandcharityforum.org/time-to-amend-unborn-victims-of-violence-laws/

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Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt and Natural Law Jurisprudence

Joe Kral

The recent SCOTUS decision regarding Texas' abortion clinic regulations have highlighted an important fact, that is the Court truly has divorced itself from the Natural Law and has married itself to legal positivism when it comes to the subject of abortion. This brief article helps explain:

http://www.truthandcharityforum.org/whole-womans-health-v-hellerstedt-and-natural-law-jurisprudence-a-catholic-comment-on-the-recent-decision/

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St. Maximus the Confessor: Theologian for the Unborn

Joe Kral

The Church has condemned abortion from the earliesst days, but the theology of the unborn has evolved. This brief article explores how one late Church Father, St. Maximus the Confessor, was ahead of his time in showing how the human conceptus is a human person by using the Incarnation as a guide.

http://www.truthandcharityforum.org/st-maximus-the-confessor-theologian-for-the-unborn/

 

 

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Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians: The Modern Heresy

Joe Kral

For years it has been argued that those politicians who support abortion are practicing a form of heresy. This brief article explains exactly why this is the case.http://truthandcharityforum.org/pro-abortion-catholic-politicians-the-modern-heresy/

 

 

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Humanizing the Unborn: The Case for Burying the Unborn Legislation

Joe Kral

With the latest scandal of Planned Parenthood selling fetal body parts there has been a need to address this problem. In addition, for decades pro-life advocates have rescued those remains from the garbage bins of abortion clinics. This brief article explores the need for legislation that would require clinics to either inter or bury those remains and how this advocating for a corporeal work of mercy. You may view the article here:http://truthandcharityforum.org/humanizing-the-unborn-the-case-for-burying-the-unborn-legislation/

 

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The Case for the Abortion Pill Reversal Information Act

Joe Kral

Many people do not know that the effects of the abortion pill can be reversed. It can. This brief article analyzes the morall issues surrounding a legislative initiative that would inform women of this medical technology before they take abortion inducing drugs.

 

 

http://truthandcharityforum.org/the-case-for-the-abortion-pill-reversal-information-act/

 

 

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Can a Catholic Morally Vote for a Third Party Candidate in 2016?

Joe Kral

Given the fact that both major party candidates not only hold positions which are considered as intrinsic evils, but also have severe moral character issues, this brief article explores the morality of voting third party using the US Bishops document Forming Consciences for a Faithful Citizenship as a guide. You may read the article at Truth and Charity Forum.

http://truthandcharityforum.org/can-a-catholic-morally-vote-for-a-third-party-candidate-in-2016/

 

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The Moral Case to Eliminate Wrongful Birth Suits

Joe Kral

Lately, there has been a movement to pass legislation such as AUL's Prenatal Nondiscrimination Act. However, this article explores the moral need to also pass legislation that would prohibit wrongful birth suits. The full article can be viewed here:

http://truthandcharityforum.org/the-moral-case-to-eliminate-wrongful-birth-suits/

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Blessed Margaret of Castello: Patron for Legislation Protecting the Disabled Unborn

Joe Kral

This brief article originally published in Truth and Charity Forum details why /Blessed Margaret should be considered as the Patron for legislation that protects those unborn children with disabilities. You may view the article here: http://truthandcharityforum.org/blessed-margaret-of-castello-patron-for-legislation-protecting-the-disabled-unborn/

 

 

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The Moral Case for States to Pass Partial Birth Abortion Bans

Joe Kral

 

While it is well known that federal law prohibits the practice of partial birth abortion, this article explores the moral need for states to also enact such measures. This article brings to light why there is an imperative in light of fetal organ harvesting as to the moral necessity of such legislation. You may view the article in its entirety here: http://truthandcharityforum.org/the-moral-case-for-states-to-pass-partial-birth-abortion-bans/

 

 

 

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International Society for Political Psychology Annual Meeting/Paper presentation

Dr. Denis C. Larrivee

Title of paper: Neuroscience and neuromodulation of free will: The case for personalistic agency in politics and ideology.

Authors: Denis Larrivee, PhD Diocese of Charleston, SC USA. Adriana Gini, MD San Camillo Forlanini Medical Center, Rome, ITALY

Section: Neuroscience and Political Psychology.

Topic: This paper discusses current neuroscience discoveries in light of the impact of neuromodulation proposals on political liberty.

 

 

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Brain Computer Interfacing, Retrofitted Exoskeletons, and Body Schema: Retrieving the Self in a Malleable Body Image

Dr. Denis C. Larrivee

This work presents ethical concerns related to modulation of neural self circuitry. Conference: Neuroethics Network, 2016. Venue: ICM Hopital Pitie Salpitriere, Paris, FRANCE.

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The Medium or the Message: Neuroethics and the Perceptual Influence of Information Use

Dr. Denis C. Larrivee

This work explores some modern metaphysical conceptions on neuroethical issues. Conference: Neuroethics Network2016. Venue: ICM Hopital Pitie Salpitriere, Paris, FRANCE.

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Brain Failure and Somatic Integration: The Body Image and the Shifting Neural Paradigm

Dr. Denis C. Larrivee

This paper proposes an ontological philosophy of science model for death determinations. Conference: Critical Juncture2016. Venue: Emory U, Atlanta USA.

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Facing Up to Real Doctrinal Difference: How Some Thought-Motifs from Derrida Can Nourish the Catholic-Buddhist Dialogue

Prof. Robert Magliola

Rev. William Skudlarek, OSB, consultore, Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, finds “convincing” the claim that “this book makes it possible for Christians to affirm the positive role of other—in this case Buddhist—spiritual practices and teachings in God’s plan … without bracketing or abandoning their Christian commitment.” Written by a longtime specialist in Buddhism, Catholic-Buddhist Dialogue, and contemporary Continental philosophy, this book opposes the notion of “dual belonging” and the “common-ground” model of dialogue which reduces the major faiths to “Interbeing” (as Paul Knitter does in his very popular book). Please see the Publisher’s link  at http://angelicopress.com/magliola-real-doctrinal-difference/

(Angelico Press, 2014), 224 pp., $16,95 / via Amazon, $15.26, by Robert Magliola, Ph.D., Carmelite lay tertiary, Affiliate: Vangelo e Zen (Xaverian Fathers, Italy).

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"What Are They Saying? What Do They Mean? Questions and Comments about _Jesus and Buddha: Friends in Conversation_ by P. Knitter and R. Haight"

Prof. Robert Magliola

My article argues that Knitter/Haight depend on an outdated Historical-Critical method the disparate conclusions of which are now displaced by new archeological findings, very recent discoveries of ancient Biblical manuscripts and papyri, and so on. Knitter/Haight also found their conjectures on a 19th and 20th century holistic metaphysics (Positivism and Scientism, for example) that Catholics can shatter by way of an orthodox Catholic deconstuction and Buddhists can shatter by way of Madhyamikan and other erudite doctrinal traditions. What Catholic theology can assimilate from Buddhism is not Buddhist teachings that are adverse to established Catholic ones but Asian thought-forms, such as the tetralemma: x is, x is-not, x both is and is-not, x neither is nor is-not. The tetralemma can serve Catholic theology very well indeed. Here is the link to my article: http://www.dimmid.org/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC=%7bC538F82D-A3DF-4827-AF97-171BA1C98EDA%7d 

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Divine Causality and Human Free Choice: Domingo Banez, Physical Premotion and the Controversy de Auxiliis Revisited

Dr. Robert Joseph Matava

NEW BOOK: The Controversy de Auxiliis was the Catholic variant of an intra-confessional, post-Reformation theological dispute over the relationship of divine grace and human cooperation. It was terminated by the Holy See with no definitive resolution over four centuries ago. In Divine Causality and Human Free Choice, R.J. Matava explains the doctrine of physical premotion defended by Domingo Báñez, whose position in the Controversy de Auxiliis has been typically ignored in contemporary discussions of providence and freewill. Through a close engagement with untranslated primary texts, Matava shows Báñez’s relevance to recent debates about middle knowledge. Finding the mutual critiques of Báñez and Molina convincing, Matava argues that common presuppositions led both parties into an insoluble dilemma. However, Matava also challenges the informal consensus that Lonergan definitively resolved the controversy. Developing a position independently advanced by several recent scholars, Matava explains how the doctrine of creation entails a position that is more satisfactory both philosophically and as a reading of Aquinas.

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Metaphysics, Anthropology, the Virtues, and the Christian Physician

Ms. Louise A. Mitchell

Ph.D. dissertation: in progress

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Major Changes in Principles of Biomedical Ethics

Ms. Louise A. Mitchell

This article explores the evolution of Principles of Biomedical Ethics by Tom Beauchamp and James Childress over its seven editions (1979–2013).

http://www.pdcnet.org/pdc/bvdb

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Free to Be Human: Thomas Aquinas’s Discussion of Liberum Arbitrium

Ms. Louise A. Mitchell

Thomas Aquinas’s use of the terms libero, libertas, and liberum arbitrium in the Summa theologiae gives us a wealth of information about free will and freedom.

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Theology of Catholic University Mission

Dr. Timothy P. Muldoon

In Ex Corde Ecclesiae, Saint John Paul II called for integration of knowledge in Catholic universities:

a University, and especially a Catholic University, "has to be a 'living union' of individual organisms dedicated to the search for truth ... It is necessary to work towards a higher synthesis of knowledge, in which alone lies the possibility of satisfying that thirst for truth which is profoundly inscribed on the heart of the human person." (16)

As editor of Integritas: Advancing the Mission of Catholic Higher Education, I seek to reflect on the question of what that higher synthesis looks like both in method and in content. I am working on a book, arising from several peer-reviewed articles, that considers the theological anthropology of Bernard Lonergan as a resource for considering the relationship between teaching, learning, and research.

I am further interested in considering the ecclesiology of the Catholic university, rooted in both an epistemic framework and a Christology. Fundamentally, I am interested in how Lonergan's notion of cosmopolis--of cultural growth and reversing cultural decline--can point toward a unified mission of a university even amidst the methodological and substantial distinctions among the disciplines. Briefly stated, my interest is in the ways that the Catholic university calls forth transcendent questions among faculty, such that their disicplinary interests may move toward a vision of cultural growth. Such a vision is consistent with what we find in the documents of the Second Vatican Council, such as Lumen Gentium and Gaudium et Spes. This vision, properly understood, is also consistent with calls for the new evangelization, understood as a renewal of the sources of cultural growth.

The university itself is the locus of cultural growth inasmuch as it is a place of intellectual, moral, spiritual, and religious conversion. It will seek to iterate the markers of cultural growth: service to the poor; practices of justice and mercy; deepened understanding of what causes marginalization. Far from being a kind of utopia, it is a place that is willing to name sin and call upon God for mercy. In the contemporary world, the university--drawing from the expertise of so many who labor under its auspices--will seek fair labor practices; it will contribute to building a culture of life; it will seek solutions to poverty and environmental destruction; it will enhance opportunities for women; it will be an engine for economic growth. Rooted in Catholic social teaching, it will challenge expressions of individual, dramatic, and group bias, but it will go on to raise transcendent questions that open members to the workings of divine grace.

 

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Protection of Conscience Project

Mr. Sean Murphy

The Protection of Conscience Project is a non-denominational, non-profit initiative supported by an  Advisory Board and Project team.  The Project does not take a position on the morality of contentious procedures.  Instead, it critiques policies of coercion and encourages accommodation of objecting health care workers.  For the benefit of those working for protection of conscience, the Project

  • provides information
  • offers suggestions
  • encourages co-operation
  • facilitates communication

As the opportunity arises, the Project responds to critics and draws attention to attitudes, policies and laws that fail to make sufficient allowance for legitimate freedom of conscience.

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CWR Essay: "Serving the Divorced and Remarried Well"

Mr. Thomas J. Nash

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The Sacramental Character of Confirmation and Its Conference of a Determinative Position in the Structure of the Church

Miss Nancy Jane Nowobilska-Tarsa, MS, Ma

  A sacramental character is a power, not a grace, and is a mode of participation in the priesthood of Jesus Christ. The confirmation character gives a power that enables a person to publicly confess the faith ex officio. Since the priestly office is inseparable from the prophetic and kingly offices, the confirmed person will exercise all three roles in the Church. View

New book: Ecce Homo: On the Divine Unity of Christ (Interventions)

Dr. Aaron Riches

Interacting with theologians throughout the ages, Riches narrates the development of the church’s doctrine of Christ as an increasingly profound realization that the depth of the difference between the human being and God is realized, in fact, only in the perfect union of divinity and humanity in the one Christ. He sets the apostolic proclamation in its historical, theological, philosophical, and mystical context, showing that, as the starting point of “orthodoxy,” it forecloses every theological attempt to divide or reduce the “one Lord Jesus Christ.”

Series: Interventions
Paperback: 280 pages
Publisher: Eerdmans (May 14, 2016)
Language: English

Francesca Murphy
— University of Notre Dame
“Ecce Homo: On the Divine Unity of Christ fulfills a need for a readable, philosophically well-informed Christology. Perceiving that the great temptation of modern Christians is to imagine Jesus as so very nice that he was just about God, Riches shows how the Christian tradition has envisaged Jesus as so profoundly divine that he was able to enter human nature and transform it. . . . With his learned reinterpretation of the tradition, Riches is creating a new paradigm for Christology. This book is a milestone for Christology in the twenty-first century.”
 
John Behr
— St. Vladimir’s Seminary, New York
“This book, in a way that is all too rare today, unites genuinely historical and theological study. Contemporary scholarship tends to separate the man Jesus from the divine Word and, consequently, to banish the divine from the created realm. Aaron Riches shows us, instead, how to understand — boldly, coherently, and consistently — the paradox of the one Lord Jesus Christ. . . . An insightful, stimulating, and often provocative presentation of the person of Christ for today.”
 
John Milbank
— University of Nottingham
“Aaron Riches has here produced by far the most novel, scholarly, and consequent contribution to Christology of recent times. He exposes the dominant semi-Nestorianism of modern theology, traces its ultimate roots in the difficult reception of the conciliar tradition from Ephesus to Constantinople II in the Latin West, and the resurgence of homo assumptus Christology in the Middle Ages and then, more powerfully, among Scotists; against this perennial semi-Nestorianism he argues instead for the more radical orthodoxy of the Cyrillian position, recovered in the Middle Ages by Thomas Aquinas, and expressed for Riches in a mystical key by the seventeenth-century French Dominican writer Louis Chardon.”

 Uwe Michael Lang
— Heythrop College, University of London
“A remarkable achievement. This book brings to life the great Christological themes of the later Patristic period, which are often buried under the weight of their technical terminology. Aaron Riches shows how the tradition shaped by Cyril of Alexandria, received in East and West, sheds light on the theological conversation today and leads us to a fuller and richer understanding of the mystery of Christ than do many modern approaches.”

Tracey Rowland
— John Paul II Institute for Marriage and Family, Melbourne
“A highly significant contribution to the field of Christology. Aaron Riches argues that the Christology sanctioned by the great ecumenical councils of the first millennium was not about finding some middle line that balanced out excessive and mutually competitive emphases on Jesus’ divinity or humanity. Rather, it was animated by an existential and liturgical encounter with the one Lord Jesus Christ, whose integral duality is recognizable only to the extent that his absolute singularity is maintained.”

 David L. Schindler
— Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family
 “Pondering the confession of the ‘one Lord Jesus Christ’ that is the basis of the Nicene faith, Riches demonstrates what is at stake in recognizing that Christianity reaches into the most intimate depths of the human being.”

 
 

 

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American Law From A Catholic Perspective

Mr. William L. Saunders, Esq.

American Law From A Catholic Perspective: Through a Clearer Lens, is now available in paperback and ebook 2016 editions.

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NEW BOOK: Retrieving Apologetics

Dr. Glenn B Siniscalchi

Given the popes' recent statements of their desires to implement the New Evangelization, it is imperative that Catholic theologians and other intellectually engaged laypersons retrieve the vital discipline of apologetics. For, the New Evangelization places particular emphasis on "reproposing the Gospel to those who have experienced a crisis of faith . . . due to secularization." One salient method of Catholic apologetics used to be characterized by three demonstrations, each of which assumes the conclusions established in the previous step(s). Some might think that this classical method of apologetics has been abandoned in the postconciliar Church, but Siniscalchi's book updates it. Unlike the classical apologetics of the preconciliar era, Siniscalchi engages contemporary scholarship in a variety of academic disciplines, such as philosophy, history, biblical studies, sociology, and theology, to develop the steps that are necessary for showing the reasonableness of faith. 

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John Locke's Sacred Physic: Faith and Medicine in the Career of John Locke

Prof. Darrick Noel Taylor, Ph.D.

This article seeks to place the medical career of John Locke in the setting of religious beliefs and allegiances in Restoration England.  It seeks to show the influence of a circle of Latitudinarian thinkers upon both his religious and medical views, mostly associated with the Earl of Shaftesbury.  Most especially, it will show the connections between Locke and Thomas Sydenham, the great English physician, not only in terms of their shared approach to medicine, but also their religious beliefs.  As a comparison of Locke's few medical writings and Sydenham's religious writings will show, they both shared a fairly common view of God's power over matter (and hence the body), which conditioned their view of medicine.  As a consequence, I will demonstrate that Locke's view of medicine was not part of any putative "medical revolution" in the 17th century, despite the radical nature of some parts of his philosophy and religious beliefs.  Part of the goal of the essay will be to call into question the usefulness of the idea of a "medical revolution" in the historiography of early modern medicine.  It also hopes to contribute to the historiography of early modern medicine as it relates to religion in the early modern period as well.  

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The Overlooked Middle

Deacon Peter Xavier Trahan

Pope Francis’ call for mercy and accompaniment, the true pastoral care of families, new forms of evangelization calling people back to the Church—many elements that need cohesiveness to form a whole, rather than various mini-pastoral movements that translate into dormant diocesan “offices of pastoral care.” Pope Francis, in his Apostolic Letter, Amoris Laetitia, says that the parish is the place where affective movement has to take place, in his words, “the parish is a family of families, where small communities, ecclesial movements, and associations live in harmony.” Pope Francis goes on to say that “this shows a need for a more adequate formation of priests, deacons, men and women religious, catechists and other pastoral workers” (AL, §202). As academics, intellectuals, and writers, some of us need to turn our perspectives toward the people themselves, to see them as they are, in themselves, and as a whole. We must lead the leaders into an authentic and true pastoral movement, which by its very dynamic, will permeate and renew human culture. While the salvos of Left and Right continue, and must continue, a new dialogue and movement must be started. This essay is not the first in that new dialogue, but it is an attempt, as I have said, to prompt our academics to write that first essay that will, indeed, begin the new dialogue. It is the middle that is the object of this movement, not the Left. The defeat of the Left will be to give them an empty court to serve into. The people will not be there.

* The full essay, The OverLooked Middle, can be found on Homiletics & Pastoral Review, Oct 2016 http://www.hprweb.com/2016/09/the-overlooked-middle/ 

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Theology of the Body, Extended: The Spiritual Signs of Birth, Impairment, and Dying (Lectio Publishing)

Dr. Susan Windley-Daoust

This book examines Pope St. John Paul II's Theology of the Body literature in its potential for creating a theological anthropology that examines how profound human experiences can serve as signs that point to God.  In doing, the book takes us the call of John Paul II to theologians to expand this anthropology seriously, by applying the hermeneutic of the gift and the understanding of the human as sign to phenomenologies of giving birth, living with impairment, and dying.  The book won 1st place in the 2015 Catholic Press Association awards, in the category "Best Book by a Small Publisher."  

Publisher website: http://www.lectiopublishing.com/books.php?b=3

The book blog: http://www.tobextended.com

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The Gift of Birth: Discerning God's Presence During Childbirth (Gracewatch Media)

Dr. Susan Windley-Daoust

Bringing together the Theology of the Body and Ignatian spirituality, this book encourages women and men to view childbirth through a spiritual lens.  

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Is There A 'Theology of the Disabled Body?': John Paul II's Theology of the Body on Limit and Sign

Dr. Susan Windley-Daoust

This peer-reviewed research article (The Journal of Disability & Religion, Vol 20, No. 3, Aug 2016) explores the possibilities embedded within John Paul II's Theology of the Body audie

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